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Boundary Objects Within a Replacement Unit Strategy for Mathematics Teacher Development

  • Yew Hoong LeongEmail author
  • Eng Guan Tay
  • Tin Lam Toh
  • Romina Ann Soon Yap
  • Pee Choon Toh
  • Khiok Seng Quek
  • Jaguthsing Dindyal
Chapter
Part of the Mathematics Education – An Asian Perspective book series (MATHEDUCASPER)

Abstract

We recognise that, for instructional innovations to take root in mathematics classrooms, curriculum redesign and teachers’ professional development are two necessary and mutually-reinforcing processes: a redesigned curriculum needs to be seen as an improvement in order to facilitate teachers’ buy-in—an ingredient for effective professional development; on the other hand, teachers’ professional development content needs to be directed towards actual useable classroom implements through the enterprise of collaborative curriculum redesign. In this chapter, we examine the interaction between researchers and teachers in this collaborative enterprise through the metaphor of boundary crossing. In particular, we study a basic model of how “boundary objects” located within a “Replacement Unit” strategy interact to advance the goals of professional development.

Keywords

Professional Development Mathematics Teacher Boundary Object Mathematics Classroom Lesson Study 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Singapore 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • Yew Hoong Leong
    • 1
    Email author
  • Eng Guan Tay
    • 1
  • Tin Lam Toh
    • 1
  • Romina Ann Soon Yap
    • 1
  • Pee Choon Toh
    • 1
  • Khiok Seng Quek
    • 1
  • Jaguthsing Dindyal
    • 1
  1. 1.National Institute of EducationNanyang Technological UniversitySingaporeSingapore

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