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Teaching for Metacognition Project: Construction of Knowledge by Mathematics Teachers Working and Learning Collaboratively in Multitier Communities of Practice

  • Berinderjeet KaurEmail author
  • Divya Bhardwaj
  • Lai Fong Wong
Chapter
Part of the Mathematics Education – An Asian Perspective book series (MATHEDUCASPER)

Abstract

Teaching for metacognition project affirms a gradual shift in the centre of gravity away from the University-based, “supply side”, “offline” forms of knowledge production conducted by university scholars for teachers towards an emergent school-based, demand-side, online, in situ forms of knowledge production conducted by teachers with support from fellow teachers, lead and senior teachers, and other experts such as university scholars and curriculum specialists. The project facilitates the participation of mathematics teachers in two-tier communities of practice. In this chapter, we describe the design of the project and the learning of two teams of teachers from two schools participating in the project. It is apparent from the findings that the teachers worked and learned collaboratively whilst participating in a first-tier and a second-tier community of practice. Their participation in the communities of practice enabled them to develop a deeper understanding of metacognition and also teaching for metacognition.

Keywords

Professional Development Mathematics Teacher Lesson Plan Professional Development Programme Mathematics Lesson 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Singapore 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • Berinderjeet Kaur
    • 1
    Email author
  • Divya Bhardwaj
    • 1
  • Lai Fong Wong
    • 2
  1. 1.National Institute of EducationNanyang Technological UniversitySingaporeSingapore
  2. 2.Anderson Secondary SchoolSingaporeSingapore

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