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Individual and Country-Level Effects of Social Trust on Happiness: The Asia Barometer Survey

Part of the Trust book series (TRUST,volume 1)

Abstract

The relationship of individual-level and country-level social trust to individuals’ happiness was investigated, using cross-national data of 39,082 participants from 29 Asian countries. For self-reported happiness, 2.0% of the participants responded they were very happy, while 18.7% were very unhappy. The significant variables associated with happiness were female gender, being age 20–29 years or 60–69 years, married, high income and education, students/retired/homemaker, religious belief, good health, and higher individual and aggregate social trust. Individual health, social trust, and aggregate social trust were all independently associated with people’s happiness. People were more likely to be happy if they lived in countries with higher aggregate social trust than countries with poor social trust.

Keywords

  • Social Capital
  • Religious Belief
  • Social Trust
  • Interpersonal Trust
  • Happy People

These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

The original version of this chapter was revised. An erratum to this chapter can be found at DOI 10.1007/978-981-10-2305-7_13

This chapter was originally published in the Journal of Applied Social Psychology 40 (10) 2574–2593 and is reproduced with permission of Wiley.

Financial support for this research was provided by Asahi Breweries, Ltd.; Ajinomoto Co., Inc.; Ebara Corporation; Millea Holdings, Inc.; Toray Industries, Inc.; Toppan Printing Co., Ltd.; Unicharm Corporation (Regional Policy Division); Asia-Pacific Bureau; Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Japan; and a scientific research grant from the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science, and Technology (#15203005)

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Correspondence to Yasuharu Tokuda .

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Tokuda, Y., Fujii, S., Inoguchi, T. (2017). Individual and Country-Level Effects of Social Trust on Happiness: The Asia Barometer Survey. In: Inoguchi, T., Tokuda, Y. (eds) Trust with Asian Characteristics. Trust, vol 1. Springer, Singapore. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-10-2305-7_8

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-10-2305-7_8

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