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Empirical Translation Studies: From Theory to Practice and Back Again

  • Sara Laviosa
  • Adriana Pagano
  • Hannu Kemppanen
  • Meng Ji
Chapter
Part of the New Frontiers in Translation Studies book series (NFTS)

Abstract

When corpora began to be used in a systematic way for the empirical study of translation, Tymoczko (Computerized corpora and the future of translation studies. Meta 43(4):657, 1998) claimed that the appeal of corpus studies lay in their potential “to illuminate both similarity and difference and to investigate in a manageable form the particulars of language-specific phenomena of many different languages and cultures”. Today, the envisioned role of corpora as invaluable repositories of data for carrying out contrastive analyses across languages and cultures is a reality in descriptive as in applied studies.

Keywords

Justification Procedure Target Language Receptor Language Source Text Translation Study 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Singapore 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • Sara Laviosa
    • 1
  • Adriana Pagano
    • 2
  • Hannu Kemppanen
    • 3
  • Meng Ji
    • 4
  1. 1.Dipartimento LELIAUniversity of Bari Aldo MoroBariItaly
  2. 2.Translation StudiesFederal University of Minas GeraisBelo HorizonteBrazil
  3. 3.Translation StudiesUniversity of Eastern FinlandJoensuuFinland
  4. 4.The University of SydneySydneyAustralia

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