Advertisement

Sustainable Luxury Fashion: A Vehicle for Salvaging and Revaluing Indigenous Culture

Chapter
Part of the Environmental Footprints and Eco-design of Products and Processes book series (EFEPP)

Abstract

Sustainable luxury is coming back into favor, essentially with its ancestral meaning, i.e., thoughtful purchasing, with consideration of artisan style manufacturing, assessment of product beauty in its broadest sense, and respect for social and environmental issues. In addition, it also means consideration of craftsmanship and innovation of different nationalities and preservation of local and ancestral cultural heritage. The relationship between luxury, textiles, and fashion is quite an ambiguous one, as textiles and fashion do not fully belong to the luxury world but overlap with luxury in its most expensive and exclusive segments. Both luxury and fashion share the common need for social differentiation, but they also differ in two major aspects. First, luxury is timeless whereas fashion is ephemeral. Second, luxury is for self-reward whereas fashion is not. Thus, the term ‘luxury-fashion’ seems to consist of two inherently contradictory expressions, i.e., as a luxury product it is supposed to last, although as a fashion product it is expected to change frequently. Nevertheless, because the essence of fashion is change, luxury fashion gives exclusive access to enforced change. Luxury fashion is recurrent change at its highest level, and it is distinguished from other luxury segments by its constant pressure for change. However, beyond these contradictions, luxury fashion should not necessarily come into conflict with sustainable principles. In this chapter we present a number of real-world case studies—Pachacuti (UK), Carmen Rion (México), Aïny (France), Loro Piana (Italy), Ermenegildo Zegna (Italy), and Hermès (France)—to demonstrate how sustainable luxury fashion can become a vehicle for salvaging and revaluing indigenous cultures.

Keywords

Indigenous culture Luxury Luxury fashion Sustainable luxury 

References

  1. ARCA (2015) Los Diseños de Carmen Rion Rescatan el Folclor Mexicano. http://www.arca-lab.com/conoce-el-trabajo-de-la-disenadora-mexicana-carmen-rion/. Accessed 2 Nov 2015
  2. Berry CJ (1994) The idea of luxury—a conceptual and historical investigation. Cambridge University Press, New YorkGoogle Scholar
  3. Caras de la Información (2015) Las verdaderas diseñadoras textiles mexicanas, son las artesanas indígenas de este país. http://carasdelainformacion.com/2015/02/10/carmen-rion-las-verdaderas-disenadoras-textiles-mexicanas-son-las-artesanas-indigenas-de-este-pais/. Accessed 2 Nov 2015
  4. Cataldi C, Dickson M, Grover C (2010) Slow fashion: tailoring a strategic approach towards sustainability. Thesis submitted for completion of Master’s in strategic leadership towards sustainability, School of Engineering, Blekinge Institute of Technology, Karlskrona, SwedenGoogle Scholar
  5. Comunidad Textil (2011) Los bordados mexicanos, un hallazgo que sedujo a Hermès. http://www.comunidadtextil.com/news1/2011/03/los-bordados-mexicanos-un-hallazgo-que-sedujo-a-hermes/. Accessed 3 Feb 2014
  6. Corcuera R, Dasso MC (2008) Introducción. In: Corcuera R, Dasso MC (eds) Tramas criollas. Ediciones CIAFIC, Buenos Aires, pp 9–22Google Scholar
  7. Cutuli G (2008) El textil en el contexto cultural. In: Corcuera R, Dasso MC (eds) Tramas criollas. Ediciones CIAFIC, Buenos Aires, pp 25–34Google Scholar
  8. Dixon SEA, Clifford A (2007) Ecopreneurship: a new approach to managing the triple bottom line. J Organ Change Manage 20(3):326–345CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. Dresner S (2002) The principles of sustainability. Earthscan, LondonGoogle Scholar
  10. FIDA, PRODERNOA FLACSO (2005) El Sector de Artesanías en las Provincias del Noroeste Argentino. PRODERNOA, Buenos AiresGoogle Scholar
  11. Flechter K (2008) Sustainable fashion and textiles—design journeys. Earthscan, LondonGoogle Scholar
  12. Flechter K (2014) Sustainable fashion and textiles—design journeys, 2nd edn. Earthscan, LondonGoogle Scholar
  13. Gardetti MA (2005) Sustainable development, sustainability and corporate sustainability. In: Gardetti MA (ed) Texts in corporate sustainability—integrating social, environmental and economic considerations with short and long term. LA-BELL, Buenos AiresGoogle Scholar
  14. Gardetti MA (2011) Sustainable luxury in Latin America. Lecture delivered at the seminar sustainable luxury & design within the framework of the MBA of IE. Instituto de Empresa—Business School, MadridGoogle Scholar
  15. Gardetti MA (2015) Loewe: luxury and sustainable management. In: Gardetti MA, Muthu SS (eds) Handbook of sustainable luxury textiles and fashion, vol 2. Springer, Singapore, pp 1–16Google Scholar
  16. Gardetti MA, Girón ME (2014) Sustainable luxury and social entrepreneurship: stories from the pioneers. Greenleaf Publishing, SheffieldGoogle Scholar
  17. Gardetti MA, Muthu SS (2015) Introduction. In: Gardetti MA, Muthu SS (eds) Handbook of sustainable luxury textiles and fashion, vol 1. Springer, Singapore, pp vii–xiGoogle Scholar
  18. Gardetti MA, Torres AL (2013a) Entrepreneurship, innovation and luxury: the Aïny Savoirs Des Peuple case. J Corp Citizsh Issue 52:55–75Google Scholar
  19. Gardetti MA, Torres AL (2013b) Introduction. J Corp Citizsh Issue 52:55–75Google Scholar
  20. Gardetti MA, Torres AL (2014) Introduction. In: Gardetti MA, Torres AL (eds) Sustainability luxury: managing social and environmental performance in iconic brands. Greenleaf Publishing, Sheffield, p 1CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  21. Giacosa E (2014) Innovation in luxury fashion family business: processes and products innovation as a means of growth. Palgrave Macmillan, New YorkCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  22. Girón ME (2012) Diccionario LID sobre Lujo y Responsabilidad. Editorial LID, MadridGoogle Scholar
  23. Godart F, Seong S (2014) Is sustainable fashion possible? In: Gardetti MA, Torres AL (eds) Sustainability luxury: managing social and environmental performance in iconic brands. Greenleaf Publishing, Sheffield, pp 12–27Google Scholar
  24. Grimes KM, Milgram BL (2000) Introduction: facing the challenges of artisan production in the global market. In: Grimes KM, Milgram BL (eds) Artisans and cooperatives—developing alternate trade for the global economy. The University of Arizona Press, Tucson, pp 3–10Google Scholar
  25. GuadiaSustentable.com. Carmen Rion: Una Fusión Auténticamente Mexicana. http://www.vanguardiasustentable.com/carmen-rion-una-fusion-autenticamente-mexicana/. Accessed 2 Nov 2015
  26. Guldager S (2015) Irreplaceable luxury garments. In: Gardetti MA, Muthu SS (eds) Handbook of sustainable luxury textiles and fashion, vol 2. Springer, Singapore, pp 73–97Google Scholar
  27. Hethorn J, Ulasewicz C (eds) (2008) Sustainable fashion, why now?—a conversation about issues, practices, and possibilities. Fairchild Books Inc., New YorkGoogle Scholar
  28. Hockerts K, Wüstenhagen R (2009) Emerging Davids versus greening Goliaths. CBS Center for Corporate Social Responsibility (Copenhagen Business School), FrederiksbergGoogle Scholar
  29. Hughes P (1996) Tissu et Travail de civilisation. Médianes, RouenGoogle Scholar
  30. Kapferer JN (2012) The luxury strategy: break the rules of marketing to build luxury brands. Kogan Page, LondonGoogle Scholar
  31. Kleanthous A (2011) Simply the best is no longer simple—Raconteur on sustainable luxury, July 2011, 3. Source: http://theraconteur.co.uk/category/sustainability/sustainable-luxury/ Accessed Dec 2012
  32. Koefoed O, Skov L (unknown year) Sustainability and fashion. In: Openwear: sustainability, openness and P2P production in the world of fashion. Research report of the EDUfashion project. http://openwear.org/data/files/Openwear%20e-book%20final.pdf. Accessed 9 May 2012
  33. Low T (unknown year) Sustainable luxury: a case of strange bedfellows. University of Bedfordshire, Institute for Tourism Research Bedfordshire, Bedfordshire Google Scholar
  34. Marshall J, Coleman G, Reason P (2011) Leadership for sustainability—an action research approach. Greenleaf Publishing Limited, SheffieldGoogle Scholar
  35. Mortelmans D (2005) Sign values in processes of distinction: the concept of luxury. Semiotica 157–1/4(2005):497–520Google Scholar
  36. Pinkhasov M, Nair RJ (2014) Real luxury: how luxury brands can create value for the long term. Palgrave Macmillan, New YorkCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  37. Popelka CA, Littrell MA (1991) Influence of tourism on handcraft evolution. Ann Tourism Res 18(1):392–413Google Scholar
  38. Rahman S, Yadlapalli A (2015) Sustainable practices in luxury apparel industry. In: Gardetti MA, Muthu SS (eds) Handbook of sustainable luxury textiles and fashion, vol 1. Springer, Singapore, pp 187–211Google Scholar
  39. Ranfgani S, Guercini S (2015) Beyond appearances: the hidden meanings of sustainable luxury. In: Gardetti MA, Muthu SS (eds) Handbook of sustainable luxury textiles and fashion, vol 2. Springer, Singapore, pp 1–16Google Scholar
  40. Romero G (2015) Camino a tenango. Thule Ediciones, BarcelonaGoogle Scholar
  41. Root RA (2005) Introduction. In: Root RA (ed) The latin america fashion reader. Berg, New York, pp 1–13CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  42. Scheibel S (unknown year) Ethical luxury—myth or trend? Essay. The London School of Economics and Political Science, LondonGoogle Scholar
  43. Sommers C (2014) Pachacuti, UK. In: Gardetti MA, Girón ME (eds) Sustainable luxury and social entrepreneurship: stories from the pioneers. Greenleaf Publishing, Sheffield, pp 71–87Google Scholar
  44. Swain MB (1993) Woman producers of ethnic arts. Ann Tourism Res 20(32):51Google Scholar
  45. Villiger A, Wüstenhagen R, Meyer A (2000) Jenseit der Öko-Nische. Birkhäuser, BaselCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  46. Walker S (2006) Sustainable by design—explorations in theory and practice. Earthscan, LondonGoogle Scholar
  47. World Commission on Environment and Development—WCED (1987) Our common future. Oxford University Press, OxfordGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Singapore 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Center for Studies on Sustainable LuxuryBuenos AiresRepublic of Argentina
  2. 2.School of Business IT and Logistics, College of BusinessRMIT UniversityMelbourneAustralia

Personalised recommendations