Advertisement

Overview of Damage to Medieval Rural Churches in Estonia

  • Paul KlõšeikoEmail author
  • Targo Kalamees
Chapter
Part of the Building Pathology and Rehabilitation book series (BUILDING, volume 7)

Abstract

It is quite well known that Estonian medieval rural church structures are in poor condition. In cases of limited resources, an understanding of the underlying problems is important in managing the churches in the most sustainable way. Although the buildings are quite well investigated from the viewpoint of art history, there have not been many studies looking into the current physical state of these buildings. This chapter examines the physical condition of rural historic churches on the basis of 10 buildings in by visual inspection. The study covers most building parts. The description of the technical solutions is given, while most common and severe defects as well as their causes are revealed. The causes of deterioration are usually tied to the freeze–thaw damage mechanism and rainwater penetration. The root cause of this stems from lack of maintenance and funding. In many cases, repairs only dealt with the consequences and not necessarily with the causes. The study shows the urgent need for solutions for maintenance and indoor climate control.

Keywords

Historic church Physical condition Pathology Case study Building survey 

Notes

Acknowledgements

The authors are grateful to Simo Ilomets, Endrik Arumägi, Üllar Alev, Lembit Kurik, and Urve Kallavus from Tallinn University of Technology for the help in conducting the survey.

The study has been conducted as part of the IUT1-15 project “Nearly-zero energy solutions and their implementation on deep renovation of buildings”. These data were gathered as a part of an international collaborative research project “Sustainable Management of Historic Rural Churches in the Baltic Sea Region” (SMC, http://smcproject.org.ee). The financial support of the Central Baltic Interreg IVA Programme 2007-2013 and Estonian Ministry of Education and Research are gratefully acknowledged.

References

  1. Kalamees T (2013) The final report of research of project “Sustainable Management of Historic Rural Churches in the Baltic Sea Region (SMC)”. Tallinn University of Technology / Conservation Centre Kanut, Tallinn-VisbyGoogle Scholar
  2. Kalamees T, Väli A, Kurik L, Napp M, Arumägi E, Kallavus U The influence of indoor climate control on risk for damages in naturally ventilated historic churches in cold climate. International Journal of Architectural Heritage (forthcoming)Google Scholar
  3. Kallavus U, Traksmaa R, Kalamees T, Kurik L (2015) Extent and reasons for biodeterioration, salt distribution and damage of plaster in Estonian medieval churches. In: Proceedings of 1st International Symposium on Building Pathology (ISBP 2015)Google Scholar
  4. Kurik L, Kalamees T, Kallavus U (2015) The use of microwave method for diagnosis of moisture content of massive dolostone walls of medieval churches. In: Proceedings of 1st International Symposium on Building Pathology (ISBP 2015)Google Scholar
  5. Napp M, Kalamees T (2015) Energy use and indoor climate of conservation heating, dehumidification and adaptive ventilation for the climate control of a medieval church in a cold climate. Energy Build 108:61–71. doi: 10.1016/j.enbuild.2015.08.013 CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. Odgers D, Henry A, Martin B, Wood C (2012) Practical Building Conservation: Stone by English Heritage. English Heritage, Ashgate Publishing Limited, FarnhamGoogle Scholar
  7. Stewart A, Stewart J, Martin B, Wood C (2012) Practical Building Conservation: Mortars, Renders & Plasters. English Heritage, Ashgate Publishing Limited, FarnhamGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Singapore 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Chair of Building Physics and Energy EfficiencyTallinn University of TechnologyTallinnEstonia

Personalised recommendations