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“Isolation” Cases

  • Fang WangEmail author
Chapter

Abstract

To escape from wars, the Hakka people of China made several large ethnic migrations from the Zhongyuan region to the Southern Fujian region. In that region, the Hakka people built culturally unique fortress-like structures to defend their culture and themselves. These structures are the Hakka earthen buildings.

Keywords

Qing Dynasty Ming Dynasty City Wall Taihang Mountain Postal Road 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Singapore 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.College of Architecture and Landscape ArchitecturePeking UniversityBeijingChina

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