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“Integration” Cases

  • Fang WangEmail author
Chapter

Abstract

Composed primarily of quartz sandstone, Mount Cangyan is an example of a peak-forest landform. Cleverly integrated into this landscape, Bridge-Tower Hall bestrides the gap between two cliffs.

Keywords

Bridge Pier Editorial Committee Gobi Desert Sinkiang Uygur Autonomous Region Vertical Shaft 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Singapore 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.College of Architecture and Landscape ArchitecturePeking UniversityBeijingChina

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