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“Advancing” Cases

  • Fang WangEmail author
Chapter

Abstract

Location: Nanjing, Jiangsu Province. Key Geographical Concept: Architectural responses to a great man of moral integrity. As a classic work of architecture in China, the Sun Yat-sen Mausoleum seeks to express the great soul and ambitious ideals in physical form of one of the most influential leaders in Chinese history, Sun Yat-sen.

Keywords

Qing Dynasty Environmental Management System Ming Dynasty Moral Integrity Frost Heaving 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Singapore 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.College of Architecture and Landscape ArchitecturePeking UniversityBeijingChina

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