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“Sentiment” Cases

  • Fang WangEmail author
Chapter

Abstract

The Yumenguan and Yangguan Passes are located on the northwestern and southwestern sides of Dunhuang City, respectively. The Yangguan Pass sits to the south of the Yumenguan Pass. Dunhuang is located on the western terminus of the Hexi Corridor, upstream from the Danghe River diluvial fan.

Keywords

Mani Field Dongting Lake Tang Dynasty Hexi Corridor Rolling Wave 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Singapore 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.College of Architecture and Landscape ArchitecturePeking UniversityBeijingChina

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