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Investigating Types of Information from WEEE Take-Back Systems in Order to Promote Design for Recovery

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Sustainability Through Innovation in Product Life Cycle Design

Part of the book series: EcoProduction ((ECOPROD))

Abstract

Waste electrical and electronic equipment (WEEE) recovery facilities have been set up for the last decade to promote a circular economy. Their activities focus on the reuse, remanufacturing and/or recycling of products. Currently, little information reaches designers regarding the requirements that these facilities have on product design. Therefore, most products are not designed to be properly recovered. The aim of this paper is to explore the nature of product life-cycle information from recovery organisations that could be shared in order to improve resource efficiency. The focus is on how information exchange can benefit the end-of-life phase of forthcoming designed products. Two levels of information have been identified, macroscopic and microscopic. Our study is illustrated with a detailed analysis of the French WEEE compliance scheme and an in-depth analysis of an IT remanufacturing facility in Sweden. Based on the case studies, we have identified current and potential information flows between different stakeholders that could benefit design for recovery.

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Acknowledgements

The authors would like to thank the French Environmental Protection Agency (ADEME) for sharing its database on WEEE treatment operators. The authors further acknowledge VINNOVA, the Swedish innovation agency, for financing the case study presented in this paper. Finally, we would like to extend our gratitude to the respondents for their contributions.

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Correspondence to Louise Lindkvist .

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Lindkvist, L., Movilla, N.A., Sundin, E., Zwolinski, P. (2017). Investigating Types of Information from WEEE Take-Back Systems in Order to Promote Design for Recovery. In: Matsumoto, M., Masui, K., Fukushige, S., Kondoh, S. (eds) Sustainability Through Innovation in Product Life Cycle Design. EcoProduction. Springer, Singapore. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-10-0471-1_1

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