Chinese Education Models in a Global Age: Myth or Reality?

Chapter
Part of the Education in the Asia-Pacific Region: Issues, Concerns and Prospects book series (EDAP, volume 31)

Abstract

The extent to which a distinct Chinese education model can be identified is the subject of much debate. Among the many studies that approach the question, there is a tendency to be selective in elaborating the constituent elements of what could be viewed as a Chinese education model. Moreover, conceptualizations of Chinese education risk implying homogeneity in what can be more accurately understood as the overlapping of heterogeneous notions and practices in different educational contexts. By synthesizing evidence presented in this book and the research that has preceded it, this chapter aims to delineate the main aspects of what has been referred to as a Chinese education model. The chapter first argues that the Chinese education model is characterized by three attributes: dynamism, hybridity, and heterogeneity. It then makes the case that the Chinese education model can be more clearly understood by conceptually disaggregating it into its three key elements: norms, institutions, and individuals.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Singapore 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.International Doctoral Program in Asia-Pacific StudiesNational Chengchi UniversityTaipeiTaiwan

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