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Economic and Ideational Theories of Marriage and Fertility Behaviour

  • Nobutaka Fukuda
Chapter

Abstract

We will, in this chapter, attempt to reconsider a theory of marriage and fertility behaviour from a viewpoint of social action theory. Following on from this, we will first provide a review of the second demographic transition theory. We will move on to discuss the differences between ideational and economic approaches to the explanation of marriage and fertility behaviour. Subsequently, the two behavioural models will be discussed from a viewpoint of rational choice theory, followed by a discussion of the influence of institutional contexts on marriage and fertility behaviour. The concluding emphasis of this chapter will be placed on the importance of empirical studies of the two theories.

Keywords

Economic theories Ideational theories Institutional settings Path dependence Rational action Second demographic transition 

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Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Tohoku UniversitySendaiJapan

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