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Beginning to Unravel a Narrative Tension in My Professional Learning about Teaching Writing

Chapter
Part of the Studies in Professional Life and Work book series (SPLW)

Abstract

A burden that I carry from my past and for which I feel accountable is the educational privilege that characterised my school experience as a White1, middleclass, high-achiever in apartheid South Africa. While it might seem disingenuous to describe educational privilege as a burden, in looking back over my professional life as a teacher and university educator, I can see how my initial choice to become a teacher and my subsequent pedagogic choices and undertakings have been influenced by my emotional distress at having been privileged, primarily because of my racial classification, at the expense of other children.

Keywords

Professional Learning Teaching Writing Field Text Doctoral Research Narrative Inquiry 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Sense Publishers 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.University of KwaZulu-NatalSouth Africa

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