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Part of the book series: New Research – New Voices ((NRNV))

Abstract

The research object of this chapter is school librarians as leaders of extracurricular reading groups in secondary schools. The study was undertaken in England where young people continue to read less independently and find less pleasure in reading than many of their peers in other countries (Twist, Schagen, & Hodgson 2007; Twist, Sizmur, Bartlett, & Lynn, 2012).

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Cremin, T., Swann, J. (2017). School Librarians as Leaders of Extracurricular Reading Groups. In: Pihl, J., van der Kooij, K.S., Carlsten, T.C. (eds) Teacher and Librarian Partnerships in Literacy Education in the 21st Century. New Research – New Voices. SensePublishers, Rotterdam. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-94-6300-899-0_9

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-94-6300-899-0_9

  • Publisher Name: SensePublishers, Rotterdam

  • Online ISBN: 978-94-6300-899-0

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