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The Understanding of Human Anatomy Elicited from Drawings of Some Bangladeshi Village Women and Children

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Abstract

There are a number of methods to obtain information about a person’s understanding of science (White & Gunston, 1992; Tunnicliffe & Reiss, 1999a). Drawings are considered one useful tool (Haney et al., 2004). Most techniques require respondents to talk or write their answers to questions. Osborne and Gilbert, 1980 used oral questions whilst written responses have been analysed, for example by Lewis, Leach and Wood-Robinson, 2000. Tunnicliffe and Reiss (1999b) elicited children’s spontaneous conversations about learners’ interpretations of brine shrimps.

Keywords

  • Science Education
  • Student Teacher
  • Human Anatomy
  • Inside Part
  • Internal Anatomy

These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Tunnicliffe, S.D., Sarker, A. (2017). The Understanding of Human Anatomy Elicited from Drawings of Some Bangladeshi Village Women and Children. In: Katz, P. (eds) Drawing for Science Education. SensePublishers, Rotterdam. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-94-6300-875-4_8

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-94-6300-875-4_8

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