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Development of Biological Literacy through Drawing Organisms

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Abstract

This chapter is about how children’s drawings convey their level of conceptual understanding of organisms. Drawings are a useful pedagogical tool as a window to investigate children’s conceptual knowledge and the meanings they give to this form of expression. We analyzed the drawings collected from pupils living in rural areas, towns, and suburban areas in Brazil. Louv (2008) has written that young children may be out of touch with wildlife in developed countries. However, in every culture children can be seen as interested in living things, identifying, classifying, and seeking patterns, especially about animals (Tomkins & Tunnicliffe, 2007).

Keywords

  • Mental Model
  • Natural World
  • Work Memory Training
  • Internal Anatomy
  • Biological Literacy

These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Bartoszeck, A.B., Tunnicliffe, S.D. (2017). Development of Biological Literacy through Drawing Organisms. In: Katz, P. (eds) Drawing for Science Education. SensePublishers, Rotterdam. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-94-6300-875-4_5

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-94-6300-875-4_5

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