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Introduction: Drawing and Science are Inseparable

Drawing is a Human Expression for Teaching/Learning

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Abstract

The act of drawing is an act of recording. Science requires the recording of data to seek insights and patterns. The mind that contemplates recording in a place and with a medium that will be seen by others at a future time implies a mind that can conceive of a future and also believes in teaching/learning through communication. Some researchers believe that it is likely that this cognitive ability—in this case, provided by drawing data—marks the distinction between our species and other hominids (Suddendorf & Corballis, 2007). We humans could plan for a future we could imagine.

Keywords

  • Science Education
  • Teacher Candidate
  • Socioscientific Issue
  • Prospective Elementary Teacher
  • Mental Time Travel

These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Katz, P. (2017). Introduction: Drawing and Science are Inseparable. In: Katz, P. (eds) Drawing for Science Education. SensePublishers, Rotterdam. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-94-6300-875-4_1

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-94-6300-875-4_1

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