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Fostering Democratic Practices in the Classroom

An Ontological Model
  • Uchenna Baker

Abstract

Colleges and universities are being challenged to prepare students to become empowered leaders who know themselves as engaged, active participants in the creation of a future for society. Unfortunately some students are graduating from of our higher education institutions without having acquired the critical skills needed to navigate life with power. Some students are not getting sufficient opportunities for critical thinking, self-agency, and social action in the classroom.

Keywords

Social Justice Critical Thinking Active Participant Internal Dialogue Ontological Model 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Sense Publishers 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  • Uchenna Baker
    • 1
  1. 1.Elon UniversityUSA

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