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What Comes Next – Insights for Reform Initiatives and Future Research

  • Esther Sui Chu Ho
Chapter
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Abstract

Education is a key component of human development. Education can develop a person’s capability so that an individual can pursue ways of being and doing what one has reasons to value (Sen, 1999). By putting Amartya Sen’s Capability Approach in the context of basic education, the ultimate goal of education is to develop the capabilities of children and youth so that they are able to live a life they value.

Keywords

Human Development Index School Climate Capability Approach Southeast Asian Country Reading Literacy 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Sense Publishers 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  • Esther Sui Chu Ho
    • 1
  1. 1.Hong Kong Centre for International Student AssessmentHong Kong

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