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Becoming Earth pp 137-161 | Cite as

The Call to Performance

  • Norman Denzin
Chapter
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Abstract

Given that the logic of privatization and free trade now … obviously shapes archetypes of citizenship, and manages our perceptions of what constitutes the ‘good society’ … it stands to reason that new critical ethnographic research approaches must take global capitalism not as an end point of analysis, but as a starting point.

Keywords

Social Justice Performance Study Black Male Color Line Fishing Trip 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Sense Publishers 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  • Norman Denzin
    • 1
  1. 1.University of Illinois at Urbana-ChampaignUSA

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