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Representing Other

Finding Reflections of Myself from a Space In-Between a Garden and a Museum
  • Kendra Fehr
Chapter

Abstract

As a museum educator, my role is to represent and reveal works of art, artefacts or spaces connected to individuals or to a group which have some type of national, ethnic, cultural or social significance. Because I am a cultural hybrid, I often feel like an inadequate interloper who cannot represent anyone’s culture with integrity and purity because it is not mine and I am not theirs.

Keywords

Organization Family International Childhood Cultural Hybrid Traditional Building Museum Educator 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Sense Publishers 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  • Kendra Fehr
    • 1
  1. 1.Public Programs Specialist Surrey Museum SurreyBritish ColumbiaCanada

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