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Limitation and Creativity

A Chaos Theory of Careers Perspective
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Abstract

In this chapter we first will argue that limitations need to be acknowledged simply as part of human experience and that if properly conceptualized, they will assist both career counselors and their clients, to a deeper appreciation of reality and to more effective ways of successfully negotiating it. Next the nature of limitation will be examined and its implications for how we ought to think about our lives and careers.

Keywords

Career Development Australian Journal Strange Attractor Chaos Theory Career Counselling 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Sense Publishers 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Australian Catholic UniversityAustralia

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