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The Past is in the Present

Images of New Zealand Māori Identity
  • Nicola F. Johnson
Part of the Transgressions: Cultural Studies and Education book series (TRANS, volume 107)

Abstract

I am not a Māori scholar researching about Māori. I am a pakeha (white/European) researcher who wants to share with an international audience the insights and strengths of the Māori of whom I am proud to know. I am an outsider looking in to Māoritanga (way of life) and I embrace the insights and strengths of Māori ways of knowing.

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Copyright information

© Sense Publishers 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  • Nicola F. Johnson

There are no affiliations available

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