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Introduction. The Dilemma of Leaving: Political and Military Exit Strategies

  • Jörg Noll
  • Daan van den Wollenberg
  • Georg Frerks
Chapter
Part of the NL ARMS book series (NLARMS)

Abstract

The introduction to the volume provides an overview of recent issues central to political, military, and academic debates about political and military exit strategies from conflicts and wars. One important concept is the supposed political-military divide, time and again expressed in the dichotomy end states versus end dates. Th e different contributions of the volume show that there exist nuances in this divide, due to different responsibilities and tasks at four levels, i.e., the political, strategic, operational and tactical. The volume reflects the diversity and multi-disciplinary character of the Faculty of Military Sciences, combining academia with military experience.

Keywords

Exit strategy end state end date political-military relations transformation and transition 

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Copyright information

© T.M.C. Asser Press and the authors 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jörg Noll
    • 1
  • Daan van den Wollenberg
    • 1
  • Georg Frerks
    • 2
  1. 1.Faculty of Military Sciences of the Netherlands Defence AcademyBredaThe Netherlands
  2. 2.Faculty of Military Sciences of the Netherlands Defence AcademyBredaThe Netherlands

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