Privacy, Liberty and Security

Chapter
Part of the Information Technology and Law Series book series (ITLS, volume 25)

Abstract

This chapter provides an overview of the concept of privacy, liberty and security; outlines the merits of privacy; provides an overview of the international legal instruments that stipulate the right to privacy; and clarifies the interrelationship between privacy, liberty, and security.

Keywords

Privacy Liberty Security Human rights 

References

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Copyright information

© T.M.C. Asser Press and the author(s) 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Leiden UniversityLeidenThe Netherlands

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