Advertisement

Environment

Contributions of Design and Education to the Sustainment of Planet Earth
Chapter
  • 940 Downloads
Part of the International Technology Education Studies book series (ITES, volume 5)

Abstract

Any book that aims to deal with issues of sustainable futures will necessarily have a significant focus on environmental sustainability. Historically, concerns over sustainable futures were predominantly focused on the environment, with references going back as far as, for example, the 7th century when legislation was introduced to protect birds in the Farne Islands off the north east coast of England. More recently there has been recognition that sustainable futures depend on complex sets of relationships.

Keywords

Sustainable Development Technology Education Environmental Education United Nations Environment Programme Sustainable Future 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Baynes, K. ( 2009 ). Models of change: The impact of ‘designerly thinking’ on people’s lives and the environment. Seminar 1: Modelling and intelligence ( Vol. Occasional Paper 3 ). Loughborough, England : University of Loughborough.Google Scholar
  2. Bonnett, M. ( 2002 ). Education for sustainability as a frame of mind. Environmental Education Research, 8 ( 1 ), 9 – 20.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. Bonnett, M. ( 2013 ). Sustainable development, environmental education, and the significance of being in place. The Curriculum Journal, 24 ( 2 ), 250 – 271.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. Carson, R. ( 1962 ). Silent spring. Boston, MA : Houghton Mifflin.Google Scholar
  5. Elshof, L. ( 2006 ). Productivism and the product paradigm in technological education. Journal of Technology Education, 17 ( 2 ), 19 – 33.Google Scholar
  6. Elshof, L. ( 2009 ). Toward sustainable practices in technology education. International Journal of Technology and Design Education, 19 ( 2 ), 133 – 147.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. Fleming, R. ( 2013 ). Design education for a sustainable future. London, England : Earthscan (Routledge). Fletcher, K. ( 2008 ). Sustainable fashion and textiles: Design journeys. London : Earthscan.Google Scholar
  8. Fletcher, K., & Tham, M. ( Eds. ). ( 2014 ). Routledge handbook of sustainability and fashion. Abingdon, England : Earthscan from Routledge.Google Scholar
  9. Flowers, J. ( 1998 ). Problem solving in technology education: A Taoist perspective. Journal of Technology Education, 10 ( 1 ), 20 – 26.Google Scholar
  10. Fuad-Luke, A. ( 2008). Slow design. In M. Ehrloff & T. Marshall (Eds.), Design dictionary: Perspectives on design terminology. Basel, Switzerland : Birkhauser Architecture.Google Scholar
  11. Fuad-Luke, A. ( 2009 ). Design activism: Beautiful strangeness for a sustainable world. Abingdon, England : Earthscan from Routledge.Google Scholar
  12. Garland et al. ( 1999 ). First things first 2000. Eye Magazine, 33.Google Scholar
  13. Garmire, E., & Pearson, G. ( 2006 ). Tech tally: Approaches to assessing technological literacy. Washington, DC : National Academies Press.Google Scholar
  14. Huckle, J. ( 1993 ). Environmental education and sustainability: A view from critical theory. In J. Fien (Ed.), Environmental education: A pathway to sustainability ( pp. 43 – 68 ). Melbourne, Australia : Deakin University Press.Google Scholar
  15. Huckle, J. ( 2006 ). Education for sustainable development: A briefing paper for the training and development agency (Rev. ed. ). Retrieved from http://john.huckle.org.uk/publications_downloads.jsp
  16. ITEA. ( 2000 ). Standards for technological literacy: Content for the study of technology. Reston, V A: International Technology Education Association.Google Scholar
  17. Klein, N. ( 2000 ). No Logo. London, England : Flamingo.Google Scholar
  18. Kopnina, H. ( 2013 ). Evaluating Education for Sustainable Development (ESD): Using Ecocentric and Anthropocentric Attitudes toward the Sustainable Development (EAATSD) scale. Environment, Development and Sustainability, 15 ( 3 ), 607 – 623.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  19. Layton, D. ( 1993 ). Technology's challenge to science education: Cathedral, quarry or company store. Buckingham, England : Open University Press.Google Scholar
  20. Leopold, A. ( 1949 ). A sand county almanac and sketches here and there. New York, NY: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
  21. Manzini, E. ( 2004 ). Context-based wellbeing and the concept of regenerative solution: A conceptual framework for scenario building and sustainable solutions development. Journal of Sustainable Product Design, 2, 141–148.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  22. McDonough, W., & Partners, W. ( 1992 ). The Hannover principles: Design for sustainability ( pp. 59 ). Charlottesville, VA : William McDonough & Partners.Google Scholar
  23. McDonough, W. ( 1993 ). A Centennial Sermon: Design, ecology, ethics and the making of things. Presented at the Cathedral of St John the Divine, New York, NY. Retrieved from http://www.mcdonough.com.Google Scholar
  24. McDonough, W., & Braungart, M. ( 2002 ). Cradle to cradle: Remaking the way we make things. New York, NY : North Point Press.Google Scholar
  25. Meadows, D., Meadows, D., Randers, J., & Behrens III, W. W. ( 1972 ). The limits to growth. Washington, DC : Potomac Associates.Google Scholar
  26. Naess, A. ( 1973 ). The shallow and the deep, long-range ecology movement. A summary. Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy, 16 ( 1–4 ), 95 – 100.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  27. United Nations. ( 1987 ). Our common future: Report on the world commission on environment and development. New York, NY: United Nations.Google Scholar
  28. United Nations. ( 1992 ). Agenda 21, Rio Declaration, Forest Principles. Conference on Environment and Development. New York, NY.Google Scholar
  29. Orr, D. ( 2004 ). Earth in mind: On education, environment, and the human prospect (10th Anniversary Edition ed.). Washington, DC : Island Press.Google Scholar
  30. Orr, D. W. ( 2002 ). The nature of design: Ecology, culture and human intention. New York, NY : Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
  31. Packard, V. ( 1960 ). The waste makers. Harmondsworth : Penguin Books.Google Scholar
  32. Papanek, V. ( 1995 ). The green imperative: Ecology and ethics in design and architecture. London : Thames & Hudson.Google Scholar
  33. Pavlova, M. ( 2009 ). Conceptualisation of technology education within the paradigm of sustainable development. International Journal of Technology and Design Education, 19 ( 2 ), 109 – 132.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  34. Pavlova, M. ( 2013a ). Teaching and learning for sustainable development: ESD research in technology education. International Journal of Technology and Design Education, 23 ( 3 ), 733 – 748.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  35. Pavlova, M. ( 2013b ). Towards using transformative education as a benchmark for clarifying differences and similarities between environmental education and education for sustainable development. Environmental Education Research, 19 ( 5 ), 656 – 672.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  36. Petrina, S. ( 1998 ). The politics of research in technology education: A critical content and discourse analysis of the Journal of Technology Education, Volumes 1-8. Journal of Technology Education, 10 ( 1 ), 27 – 57.Google Scholar
  37. Pitt, J., & Lubben, F. ( 2009 ). The social agenda of education for sustainable development within design & technology: The case of the sustainable design award. International Journal of Technology and Design Education, 19 ( 2 ), 167 – 186.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  38. Porritt, J. ( 2005 ). Capitalism: As if the world mattered. London, England : Earthscan.Google Scholar
  39. Ritz, J. M. ( 2009 ). A new generation of goals for technology education. Journal of Technology Education, 20 ( 2 ), 50 – 64.Google Scholar
  40. Rose, M. A. ( 2010 ). EnviroTech: Enhancing environmental literacy and technology assessment skills. Journal of Technology Education, 22 ( 1 ), 43 – 57.Google Scholar
  41. Rossouw, A., Hacker, M., & de Vries, M. J. ( 2011 ). Concepts and contexts in engineering and technology education: An international and interdisciplinary Delphi study. International Journal of Technology and Design Education, 21 ( 4 ), 409 – 424.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  42. Rowe, J. S. ( 1994 ). The chord that harmonizes humans and earth. The Trumpeter, 11 ( 2 ), 106 – 107. Shellenberger, M., & Nordhaus, T. ( 2007 ). Break through: From the death of environmentalism to the politics of possibility. New York, NY : Houghton Mifflin.Google Scholar
  43. Smil, V. ( 1994 ). Energy in world history. Boulder, CO : Westview Press.Google Scholar
  44. Sterling, S. ( 2001 ). Sustainable education: Re-visioning learning and change. Devon, England : Green Books Ltd.Google Scholar
  45. Strauss, C., & Fuad-Luke, A. ( 2008 ). The slow design principles: A new interrogative and reflexive tool for design research and practice. Paper presented at the changing the change: Design, visions, proposals and tools, Turin, Italy.Google Scholar
  46. Tham, M., & Jones, H. ( 2008 ). Metadesign tools: Designing the seeds for shared processes of change. Paper presented at the Changing the change: Design, visions, proposals and tools, Turin, Italy.Google Scholar
  47. Tonkinwise, C. ( 2011 ). I ‘heart’ sustainability (because Necessity no longer has Agency). Design Philosophy Papers, 9 ( 2 ), 69 – 80.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  48. UNEP. ( 1972 ). Declaration of the United Nations conference on the human environment. Stockholm, Sweden : United Nations Environment Programme.Google Scholar
  49. UNESCO. ( 2005 ). United Nations decade of education for sustainable development (2005–2014): International implementation scheme ( p. 32 ). Paris, France : UNESCO.Google Scholar
  50. UNESCO-UNEP. ( 1976 ). The Belgrade Charter: A global framework for environmental education. Paris, France: UNESCO.Google Scholar
  51. UNESCO-UNEP. ( 1977 ). The Tiblisi declaration: Final report intergovernmental conference on environmental education. Paris, France: UNESCO.Google Scholar
  52. Vardy, P., & Paul, G. ( 1999 ). The puz zle of ethics. London, Fount : Harper Collins.Google Scholar
  53. Vare, P., & Scott, W. ( 2007 ). Learning for a change: Exploring the relationship between education and sustainable development. Journal of Education for Sustainable Development, 1 ( 2 ), 191 – 198.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  54. Vernadsky, V. I. (1945). The biosphere and the noösphere. American Scientist, 33, 1 – 12.Google Scholar
  55. Walker, S. ( 2008 ). Extant objects: Designing things as they are. International Journal of Sustainable Design, 1 ( 1 ), 4 – 12.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  56. Webster, K. ( 2007 ). Changing the story: ‘Cradle-to-cradle’ thinking as a compelling framework for ESD in a globalised world. International Journal of Innovation and Sustainable Development, 2 ( 3 / 4 ), 282 – 298.Google Scholar
  57. Wood, J. ( 2010 ). Metadesign: The design practice that designs itself. In T. Inns (Ed.), Designing for the 21st century: Interdisciplinary methods and findings ( pp. 101 – 115 ). Farnham, UK : Gower publishing limitedGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Sense Publishers 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Technology Education Research Unit, Department of DesignGoldsmiths, University of LondonUK

Personalised recommendations