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I’ll Stand by You

Glee Characters’ Multiple Identities and Bystander Intervention on Bullying

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Part of the Youth, Media, & Culture Series book series (YMCS)

Abstract

Over its five seasons, Glee has depicted various forms of bullying includingzsocial ostracism, cyber-bullying, physical threats and violence, and the terrible psychological cost for offenders, victims, and bystanders. In each of these instances, major characters served as bullies, victims, and bystanders to these social acts of aggression.

Keywords

  • Sexual Orientation
  • Suicide Attempt
  • Social Identity
  • School Climate
  • Football Team

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Dillon, K.p. (2015). I’ll Stand by You. In: Johnson, B.C., Faill, D.K. (eds) Glee and New Directions for Social Change. Youth, Media, & Culture Series. SensePublishers, Rotterdam. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-94-6209-905-0_3

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