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Exploiting the Gaps in the Fence

Power, Agency, and Rebellion in The Hunger Games
  • Michael Macaluso
  • Cori Mckenzie
Part of the Critical Literacy Teaching Series book series (LITE)

Abstract

Suzanne Collins’s (2008) The Hunger Games opens with the image of Katniss rolling out of bed, slipping on her hunting gear, and heading for the high, electrified chain-link fence that separates District 12 from the woods beyond. The fence encloses all of District 12 and ostensibly exists to keep out the flesh-eaters that roam the woods, but as many scholars have noted, the fence primarily functions as a way to oppress people and hold them in their mental, physical, and economic pre-determined place (Pavlik, 2012; Wezner, 2012).

Keywords

Multiple Modality Absolute Power Weak Spot Sovereign Power Totalitarian Regime 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© Sense Publishers 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • Michael Macaluso
  • Cori Mckenzie

There are no affiliations available

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