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Exploring the Healing Powers of Hip-Hop

Increasing Therapeutic Efficacy, Utilizing the Hip-Hop Culture as an Alternative Platform for Expression, Connection
Chapter
Part of the Constructing Knowledge: Curriculum Studies in Action book series (CKCS)

Abstract

The emotional experience of children and adolescents is unique; this emotional process is a result of the environment, parental modeling, and the resources available for emotional expression (Calkins & Hill, 2007). Youth living in lower SES neighborhoods are vulnerable to trauma exposure, victimization, and limited access to resources, all of which can impact their psychological functioning, development, and adjustment.

Keywords

Music Therapy Music Video Urban Youth Rival Gang Healing Power 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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