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The Abc’s of Being Armenian

(Re)turning to the National Identity in Post-Soviet Textbooks
  • Garine Palandjian
Chapter

Abstract

Nestled between its former enemies Turkey and Azerbaijan, Armenia has had a history of foreign domination that has contributed to the shaping of its national identity. Having survived the Armenian genocide during the Ottoman rule (1915–1923) and endured the Soviet domination (1922–1991), the most recent Nagorno-Kharabakh conflict (1988–present), as well as several waves of emigration throughout the centuries, Armenians have nonetheless maintained a strong sense of national identity.

Keywords

National Identity Education Reform World Culture Critical Discourse Analysis School Textbook 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Sense Publishers 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • Garine Palandjian
    • 1
  1. 1.Lehigh UniversityBethlehem, PennsylvaniaUSA

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