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The Challenges Facing Higher Education in India

  • Elizabeth Vergis
Chapter

Abstract

The modern higher education system in India, although rooted in the British model, has also incorporated the oriental culture, where learning is valued for its own sake, without giving undue consideration to economic or other influential, external factors. Until Independence the Indian Higher education system remained relatively small.

Keywords

High Education International Student High Education System High Education Sector Indian Student 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© Sense Publishers 2014

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  • Elizabeth Vergis

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