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Knowledge Democracy, Higher Education and Engagement

Renegotiating the Social Contract
  • Budd Hall
Chapter
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Abstract

Higher education and publically supported higher education in particular is a space of social and political contestation. Higher education institutions play powerful roles in all our societies producing the leaders in all our fields of professional and scientific endeavor. Society has further given higher education institutions the mandate to manage knowledge on its behalf.

Keywords

High Education Social Movement High Education Institution Indigenous Knowledge Indigenous Language 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© Sense Publishers 2014

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  • Budd Hall

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