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Computational Strategies Used by Year 2 Students

  • Marlene Chesney
  • Rosemary Callingham
Part of the Bold Visions in Educational Research book series (BVER)

Abstract

This chapter presents two case studies of Year 2 students using a variety of strategies to undertake computational problems. These students had different educational backgrounds and experiences which played out in their diverse demonstrated computational skills. Such differences present a challenge for teachers in developing computational skills in the early years of schooling.

Keywords

Computational Strategy Incorrect Answer Number Fact Australian Council Australian Curriculum 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© Sense Publishers 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • Marlene Chesney
  • Rosemary Callingham

There are no affiliations available

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