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Preparing Women to be President

Advancing Women to the Top Leadership Roles in American Higher Education

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Career Moves
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Abstract

With a play on words taken from a famous song from The Who, a 2012 article in The Chronicle of Higher Education begins with, “Meet the new boss. Same as the old boss.”

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Stefanco, C.J. (2014). Preparing Women to be President. In: Vongalis-Macrow, A. (eds) Career Moves. SensePublishers, Rotterdam. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-94-6209-485-7_10

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