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Student Perceptions of the ‘Good’ Teacher and ‘Good’ Learner in New Zealand Classrooms

Chapter
Part of the Learner’s Perspective Study book series (LEPEST)

Abstract

What constitutes ‘good’ teaching and ‘good’ learning is a complex and controversial issue. Educational agencies in New Zealand, like those in other western countries, have called for synthesis of research evidence (see Anthony & Walshaw, 2007; Stanley, 2008; Ingvarson, Beavis, Bishop, Peck, & Elsworth, 2004; National Mathematics Advisory Panel, 2008; Sullivan, 2011) to inform policy and professional development initiatives aimed at improving the quality of teaching and learning outcomes.

Keywords

Mathematics Classroom Student Perception Good Teacher Normative Identity Mathematical Identity 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Sense Publishers 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.College of EducationMassey UniversityNew Zealand

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