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Transformative Learning

  • Patricia Cranton
Part of the International Issues in Adult Education book series (ADUL)

Abstract

My mother arrived in Canada in 1948 to marry a Canadian soldier whom she had met when the Canadian army participated in the liberation of the Netherlands. My mother grew up in Amsterdam where she was a part of a large musical and artistic family.

Keywords

Adult Education Adult Learning Transformative Learning Perspective Transformation Transformative Education 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Sense Publishers 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Patricia Cranton
    • 1
  1. 1.University of New BruinswickCanada

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