Practical Mysticism, Self-Knowing and Moral Motivation

  • Terence Lovat
Part of the Moral Development and Citizenship Education book series (MORA, volume 1)

Abstract

The chapter addresses the issue of moral motivation through creating a conversation between the ancient tradition of practical mysticism and current human sciences research.

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Copyright information

© Sense Publishers 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Terence Lovat
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Faculty of Education and ArtsUniversity of NewcastleNewcastleAustralia
  2. 2.Senior Research FellowUniversity of OxfordUK

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