Handbook of Moral Motivation pp 197-213

Part of the Moral Development and Citizenship Education book series (MORA, volume 1) | Cite as

Moral Motivation through the Perspective of Exemplarity

  • Lawrence J. Walker

Abstract

Why be good? This simple question, so profoundly important for human existence, has befuddled thinkers across the ages (Richter, 2007). It remains an enigma for the field of moral psychology, as evidenced by the mere existence of the present volume and the diversity of perspectives proffered herein.

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Copyright information

© Sense Publishers 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Lawrence J. Walker
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyUniversity of British ColumbiaVancouverCanada

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