Implications for Teacher Education and Educators

  • Sivakumar Alagumalai
  • Stephanie Burley
  • Margaret Scott
  • Wendy Zweck

Abstract

Teacher Education and the Scholarship of Teaching continue to be challenged and reshaped by multiple forces. Teaching, as used in pedagogical discourse, has been contested as not precise enough for everyone to agree on their application (Smith, 1987, p.14). Traditional teacher education programs that premised on philosophy, psychology and sociology have been questioned. The first direct challenge surfaced when OECD (2002, p.9) advanced “the theory of learning is pre-scientific – in the sense it lacks as yet either predictive or explanatory power.

Keywords

Malaysia OECD 

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References

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Copyright information

© Sense Publishers 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Sivakumar Alagumalai
    • 1
  • Stephanie Burley
    • 2
  • Margaret Scott
    • 3
  • Wendy Zweck
    • 4
  1. 1.School of EducationThe University of AdelaideAustralia
  2. 2.School of EducationThe University of AdelaideAustralia
  3. 3.School of EducationThe University of AdelaideAustralia
  4. 4.School of EducationThe University of AdelaideAustralia

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