Special Education within the Context of an Inclusive School

  • Alison Ekins
Part of the Studies in Inclusive Education book series (STUIE, volume 18)

Abstract

Discussions about special educational needs (SEN) are complex, with definitions and understandings of SEN in international, as well as local, contexts varying widely from a focus on ‘disability’, or ‘handicap’ to a broader understanding of SEN linked to a wide range of cognitive, behavioural or physical needs and difficulties.

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Copyright information

© Sense Publishers 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Alison Ekins
    • 1
  1. 1.Canterbury Christ Church UniversityEngland

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