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Trialogical Design Principles as Inspiration for Designing Knowledge Practices for Medical Simulation Training

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Part of the Technology Enhanced Learning book series (TEL,volume 7)

Abstract

This chapter discusses introduction of the trialogical approach to simulation training courses for medical teams involved in neonatal resuscitation. We analysed and developed knowledge practices in a tradition-laden educational context, which has not viewed itself as promoting learners’ ‘knowledge-practices’ or ‘knowledge creation’. The overarching educational objective was to support medical teams in improving their coordination, leadership, teamwork, and communication in order to contribute to patient safety.

Keywords

  • Design Principle
  • Design Pattern
  • Knowledge Creation
  • Medical Team
  • Simulation Training

These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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  • DOI: 10.1007/978-94-6209-004-0_9
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Karlgren, K. (2012). Trialogical Design Principles as Inspiration for Designing Knowledge Practices for Medical Simulation Training. In: Moen, A., Mørch, A.I., Paavola, S. (eds) Collaborative Knowledge Creation. Technology Enhanced Learning, vol 7. SensePublishers, Rotterdam. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-94-6209-004-0_9

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