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Temporal design in auditors’ professional learning

Contemporary epistemic machineries and knowledge strategies in risk auditing

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Part of the The Knowledge Economy and Education book series (KNOW,volume 6)

Abstract

Can time be turned into a “tool” for better learning? This question arose while studying how a group of newly educated Norwegian auditors1 dealt with professional demands for further learning and knowledge acquisition.

Keywords

  • Professional Learning
  • Knowledge Work
  • Knowledge Activity
  • Knowledge Society
  • Audit Firm

These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Mathisen, A. (2012). Temporal design in auditors’ professional learning. In: Jensen, K., Lahn, L.C., Nerland, M. (eds) Professional Learning in the Knowledge Society. The Knowledge Economy and Education, vol 6. SensePublishers, Rotterdam. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-94-6091-994-7_5

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