Advertisement

The Affective Domain and Mathematics Education

  • Gregor Lomas
  • Peter Grootenboer
  • Catherine Attard

Abstract

This is the third chapter on affective issues to appear in MERGA reviews of research in mathematics education and as such reflects the ongoing importance of affective issues to the mathematics education research community. The first two chapters (Grootenboer, Lomas, & Ingram, 2008; Schuck & Grootenboer, 2004) noted a continuing move away from studies on attitudes to projects on beliefs and the consideration of a broader range of affective aspects. In the current review period, 2008-2011, there is a lessening focus on beliefs, a growing focus on identity, and an even spread of studies on other affective aspects.

Keywords

Mathematics Education Mathematics Teacher Mathematics Classroom Annual Conference Professional Learning 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Afamasaga-Fuata'i K. Innovative problem solving and students' mathematics attitudes. In: Hunter R, Bicknell B, Burgess T, editors. Crossing divides (Proceedings of the 32nd annual conference of the Mathematics Education Research Group of Australasia. Palmerston North, NZ: MERGA; 2009. p. 1–8.Google Scholar
  2. Anderson J. Teachers' motivation to attend voluntary professional development in K-10 mathematics. In: Goos M, Brown R, Makar K, editors. Navigating currents and charting directions (Proceedings of the 31st annual conference of the Mathematics Education Research Group of Australasia. Brisbane, QLD: MERGA; 2008. p. 51–58.Google Scholar
  3. Attard C. Students' experiences of mathematics during the transition from primary to secondary school. In: Sparrow L, Kissane B, Hurst C, editors. Shaping the future of mathematics education (Proceedings of the 33rd annual conference of the Mathematics Education Research Group of Australasia. Fremantle, WA: MERGA; 2010. p. 53–60.Google Scholar
  4. Attard C. The influence of teachers on student engagement with mathematics during the middle years. In: Clark J, Kissane B, Mousley J, Spencer T, Thornton S, editors. Mathematics: Traditions and [new] practices (Proceedings of the 34th annual conference of the Mathematics Education Research Group of Australasia and the 23rd biennial conference of the Australian Association of Mathematics Teachers, Alice Springs. Adelaide, SA: AAMT & MERGA; 2011. p. 68–74.Google Scholar
  5. Averill R. Teaching practices for effective teacher-student relationships in multi-ethnic mathematics classrooms. In: Clark J, Kissane B, Mousley J, Spencer T, Thornton S, editors. Mathematics: Traditions and [new] practices (Proceedings of the 34th annual conference of the Mathematics Education Research Group of Australasia and the 23rd biennial conference of the Australian Association of Mathematics Teachers, Alice Springs. Adelaide, SA: AAMT & MERGA; 2011. p. 75–80.Google Scholar
  6. Bennison A, Goos M. Learning to teach mathematics with technology: A survey of professional development needs, experiences and impacts. Mathematics Education Research Journal. 2010;22(1):31–56.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. Beswick K. Influencing teachers' beliefs about teaching mathematics for numeracy to students with mathematics learning difficulties. Mathematics Teacher Education and Development. 2008;9:3–20.Google Scholar
  8. Beswick K. School mathematics and mathematicians' mathematics: Teachers' beliefs about mathematics. In: Tzekaki M, Kaldrimidou M, Sakonidis H, editors. In search of theories in mathematics education (Proceedings of the 33rd conference of the International Group for the Psychology of Mathematics Education. Thessaloniki, Greece: PME; 2009. p. 153–160.Google Scholar
  9. Beswick K. Knowledge/beliefs and their relationship to emotion. In: Kislenko K, editor. Current state of research on mathematical beliefs XVI (Proceedings of the MAVI-16 conference 2010. Tallinn, Estonia: Tallinn University; 2011a. p. 43–59.Google Scholar
  10. Beswick K. Teachers' beliefs about school mathematics and mathematicians' mathematics and their relationship to practice. Educational Studies in Mathematics. 2011b. doi: 10.1007/s10649-011-9333-2.
  11. Beswick K, Callingham R, Watson JM. The nature and development of middle school mathematics teachers' knowledge. Journal of Mathematics Teacher Education. 2011. doi: 10.1007/s10857-011-9177-9.
  12. Beswick K, Dole S. Recollections of mathematics education: Approaching graduation and 5 years later. In: Goos M, Brown R, Makar K, editors. Navigating currents and charting directions (Proceedings of the 31st annual conference of the Mathematics Education Research Group of Australasia. Brisbane, QLD: MERGA; 2008. p. 67–76.Google Scholar
  13. Brown R, Redmond T. Reconceptualising agency through teachers talking about a sociocultural approach to teaching mathematics in the classroom. In: Goos M, Brown R, Makar K, editors. Navigating currents and charting directions (Proceedings of the 31st annual conference of the Mathematics Education Research Group of Australasia. Brisbane, QLD: MERGA; 2008. p. 101–108.Google Scholar
  14. Carmichael C. The influence of the mathematics class on middle school students' interest for statistical literacy. In: Sparrow L, Kissane B, Hurst C, editors. Shaping the future of mathematics education (Proceedings of the 33rd annual conference of the Mathematics Education Research Group of Australasia. Fremantle, WA: MERGA; 2010. p. 133–138.Google Scholar
  15. Carmichael C, Hay I. Middle school students' interest in statistical literacy. In: Goos M, Brown R, Makar K, editors. Navigating currents and charting directions (Proceedings of the 31st annual conference of the Mathematics Education Research Group of Australasia. Brisbane, QLD: MERGA; 2008. p. 109–116.Google Scholar
  16. Cretchley PC. Advancing research into affective factors in mathematics learning: Clarifying key factors, terminology and measurement. In: Goos M, Brown R, Makar K, editors. Navigating currents and charting directions (Proceedings of the 31st annual conference of the Mathematics Education Research Group of Australasia. Brisbane, QLD: MERGA; 2008. p. 147–154.Google Scholar
  17. Ferguson S. Teachers' use of mathematics tasks: The impact on the mathematics learning and affective responses of low-attaining upper primary students. In: Hunter R, Bicknell B, Burgess T, editors. Crossing divides (Proceedings of the 32nd annual conference on Mathematics Education Research Group of Australasia. Palmerston North, NZ: MERGA; 2009. p. 185–192.Google Scholar
  18. Goos M. Reforming mathematics teacher education: Theorising teacher's use of technology. In: Ng C, Renshaw P, editors. Reforming learning: Concepts, issues and practice in the Asia-Pacific region. New York, NY: Springer; 2009.Google Scholar
  19. Goos M, Bennison A. Surveying the technology landscape: Teachers' use of technology in secondary mathematics classrooms. Mathematics Education Research Journal. 2008;20(3):102–130.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  20. Grootenboer P. Mathematical belief change in prospective primary teachers. Journal of Mathematics Teacher Education. 2008;2008(11):479–497.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  21. Grootenboer P, Ballantyne J. Mathematics teachers: Negotiating professional and discipline identities. In: Sparrow L, Kissane B, Hurst C, editors. Shaping the future of mathematics education (Proceedings of the 33rd annual conference of the Mathematics Education Research Group of Australasia. Fremantle, WA: MERGA; 2010. p. 225–233.Google Scholar
  22. Grootenboer P, Lomas G, Ingram N. The affective domain and mathematics education. In: Forgasz H, Barkatsas A, Bishop A, Clarke B, Keast S, Tiong Seah W, Sullivan P, editors. Review of mathematics education research in Australasia 2004-2007. Rotterdam, The Netherlands: Sense; 2008. p. 255–269.Google Scholar
  23. Ingram N. Who a student sits near to in maths: Tension between social and mathematical identities. In: Goos M, Brown R, Makar K, editors. Navigating currents and charting directions (Proceedings of the 31st annual conference of the Mathematics Education Research Group of Australasia. Brisbane, QLD: MERGA; 2008a. p. 281–286.Google Scholar
  24. Ingram, N. (2008b, July). The importance of length, breadth and depth when studying students' affective responses to mathematic through the lens of identity. Paper presented at International Congress for Mathematics Education (ICME 11), Topic Study Group 26. Monterrey, Mexico: ICME.Google Scholar
  25. Jamieson-Proctor R, Byrne C. Primary teachers' beliefs about the use of mathematics textbooks. In: Goos M, Brown R, Makar K, editors. Navigating currents and charting directions (Proceedings of the 31st annual conference of the Mathematics Education Research Group of Australasia. Brisbane, QLD: MERGA; 2008. p. 295–302.Google Scholar
  26. Jennison M, Beswick K. Student attitude, student understanding and mathematics anxiety. In: Sparrow L, Kissane B, Hurst C, editors. Shaping the future of mathematics education (Proceedings of the 33rd annual conference of the Mathematics Education Research Group of Australasia. Fremantle, WA: MERGA; 2010. p. 280–288.Google Scholar
  27. Jorgensen (Zevenbergen), R., Grootenboer, P., & Niesche, R. (2009). Insights into the beliefs and practices of teachers in a remote indigenous context. In R. Hunter, B. Bicknell, & T. Burgess (Eds.), Crossing divides (Proceedings of the 32nd annual conference on Mathematics Education Research Group of Australasia, pp. 281-288). Palmerston North, NZ: MERGA.Google Scholar
  28. Kemmis S. Praxis and practice architectures in mathematics education. In: Goos M, Brown R, Makar K, editors. Navigating currents and charting directions (Proceedings of the 31st annual conference of the Mathematics Education Research Group of Australasia. Brisbane, QLD: MERGA; 2008. p. 17–28.Google Scholar
  29. Klein M. How humanism can foster mediocrity in early years mathematics education: A poststructuralist comparison. In: Goos M, Brown R, Makar K, editors. Navigating currents and charting directions (Proceedings of the 31st annual conference of the Mathematics Education Research Group of Australasia. Brisbane, QLD: MERGA; 2008a. p. 311–316.Google Scholar
  30. Klein M. Preservice teachers and numeracy education: Can poststructuralism contribute? In: Goos M, Brown R, Makar K, editors. Navigating currents and charting directions (Proceedings of the 31st annual conference of the Mathematics Education Research Group of Australasia. Brisbane, QLD: MERGA; 2008b. p. 317–322.Google Scholar
  31. Klein M, Smith K. Being numerate for teaching: The indivisibility of learning landscape, participation and practice. In: Hunter R, Bicknell B, Burgess T, editors. Crossing divides (Proceedings of the 32nd annual conference on Mathematics Education Research Group of Australasia. Palmerston North, NZ: MERGA; 2009. p. 299–306.Google Scholar
  32. Leatham KR. Viewing mathematics teachers' beliefs as sensible systems. Journal of Mathematics Teacher Education. 2006;9:91–102.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  33. Leder G, Forgasz H. I liked it till Pythagoras: The public's views of mathematics. In: Sparrow L, Kissane B, Hurst C, editors. Shaping the future of mathematics education (Proceedings of the 33rd annual conference of the Mathematics Education Research Group of Australasia. Fremantle, WA: MERGA; 2010. p. 328–335.Google Scholar
  34. Leder G, Grootenboer P. Affect and mathematics education. Mathematics Education Research Journal. 2005;17(2):1–8.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  35. Liljedahl P. Teachers' insights into the relationship between beliefs and practice. In: Maab J, Schloglmann W, editors. Beliefs and attitudes in mathematics education: New research results. Rotterdam, The Netherlands: Sense; 2008. p. 33–44.Google Scholar
  36. Lo WY, Anderson J. Beyond the curriculum: The mathematical beliefs of pre-service primary teachers in Hong Kong. In: Sparrow L, Kissane B, Hurst C, editors. Shaping the future of mathematics education (Proceedings of the 33rd annual conference of the Mathematics Education Research Group of Australasia. Fremantle, WA: MERGA; 2010. p. 657–644.Google Scholar
  37. Martin AJ, Marsh HW. Academic buoyancy: Towards an understanding of students' everyday academic resilience. Journal of School Psychology. 2008;46(1):53–83.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  38. McConney A, Perry LB. Socioeconomic status, self-efficacy, and mathematics achievement in Australia: A secondary analysis. Educational Research, Policy and Practice. 2010;9:77–91.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  39. Meaney T, Lange T. Pre-service students' responses to being tested on their primary school mathematical knowledge. In: Sparrow L, Kissane B, Hurst C, editors. Shaping the future of mathematics education (Proceedings of the 33rd annual conference of the Mathematics Education Research Group of Australasia. Fremantle, WA: MERGA; 2010. p. 399–406.Google Scholar
  40. Mornane A. The adolescent students' views of factors influencing their learning. The International Journal of Learning. 2009;16(5):221–229.Google Scholar
  41. Norton S, Windsor W. Students' attitude towards using materials to learn algebra: A year 7 case study. In: Goos M, Brown R, Makar K, editors. Navigating currents and charting directions (Proceedings of the 31st annual conference of the Mathematics Education Research Group of Australasia. Brisbane, QLD: MERGA; 2008. p. 369–376.Google Scholar
  42. Redmond T, Sheehy J. Reconceptualising agency in a senior mathematics classroom. In: Hunter R, Bicknell B, Burgess T, editors. Crossing divides (Proceedings of the 32nd annual conference on Mathematics Education Research Group of Australasia. Palmerston North, NZ: MERGA; 2009. p. 451–458.Google Scholar
  43. Schuck S, Grootenboer P. Affective issues in mathematics education. In: Perry B, Diezmann C, Anthony G, editors. Research in mathematics education in Australasia 2000—2003. Flaxton, Australia: Post Pressed; 2004. p. 53–74.Google Scholar
  44. Sexton M. Using concept cartoons to access student beliefs about preferred approaches to mathematics learning and teaching. In: Sparrow L, Kissane B, Hurst C, editors. Shaping the future of mathematics education (Proceedings of the 33rd annual conference of the Mathematics Education Research Group of Australasia. Fremantle, WA: MERGA; 2010. p. 515–522.Google Scholar
  45. Sherley B, Clark M, Higgins J. School readiness: What do teachers expect of children in mathematics on school entry? In: Goos M, Brown R, Makar K, editors. Navigating currents and charting directions (Proceedings of the 31st annual conference of the Mathematics Education Research Group of Australasia. Brisbane, QLD: MERGA; 2008. p. 461–466.Google Scholar
  46. Sullivan P, Clarke D, O'Shea H. Students' opinions about characteristics of their desired mathematics lessons. In: Sparrow L, Kissane B, Hurst C, editors. Shaping the future of mathematics education (Proceedings of the 33rd annual conference of the Mathematics Education Research Group of Australasia. Fremantle, WA: MERGA; 2010. p. 531–538.Google Scholar
  47. Tait-McCutcheon., S. L. (2008). Self-efficacy in mathematics: Affective, cognitive, and conative domains of functioning. In M. Goos, R. Brown, & K. Makar (Eds.), Navigating currents and charting directions (Proceedings of the 31st annual conference of the Mathematics Education Research Group of Australasia, pp. 507-513). Brisbane, QLD: MERGA.Google Scholar
  48. Tobias S, Serow P, Schmude M. Critical moments in learning mathematics:First year pre-service primary teachers' perspectives. In: Sparrow L, Kissane B, Hurst C, editors. Shaping the future of mathematics education (Proceedings of the 33rd annual conference of the Mathematics Education Research Group of Australasia. Fremantle, WA: MERGA; 2010. p. 805–812.Google Scholar
  49. Walshaw M. Exploring the identity of a pre-service teacher: Communal processes during the practicum. In: Hunter R, Bicknell B, Burgess T, editors. Crossing divides (Proceedings of the 32nd annual conference on Mathematics Education Research Group of Australasia. Palmerston North, NZ: MERGA; 2009. p. 555–562.Google Scholar
  50. Walshaw M. The researcher's self in research: Confronting issues about knowing and understanding others. In: Sparrow L, Kissane B, Hurst C, editors. Shaping the future of mathematics education (Proceedings of the 33rd annual conference of the Mathematics Education Research Group of Australasia. Fremantle, WA: MERGA; 2010. p. 587–593.Google Scholar
  51. Williams, G. (2008, July). Links between optimism-building and problem solving capacity. Paper presented at International Congress for Mathematics Education (ICME 11), Topic Study Group 26, Monterrey, Mexico: ICME.Google Scholar
  52. Williams G. Engaged to learn pedagogy: Theoretically identified optimism building situations. In: Hunter R, Bicknell B, Burgess T, editors. Crossing divides (Proceedings of the 32nd annual conference on Mathematics Education Research Group of Australasia. Palmerston North, NZ: MERGA; 2009. p. 595–602.Google Scholar
  53. Williams G. Symbiosis between creative mathematical thinking accompanied by high positive affect, and optimism. In: Pinto M, Kawasaki T, editors. Optimising student understanding in mathematics (Proceedings of the 34th conference of the International Group for the Psychology of Mathematics Education. Belo Horizonte, Brazil: PME; 2010. p. 297–304.Google Scholar
  54. Wilson S. My struggle with maths may not have been a lonely one: Bibliotherapy in a teacher education number theory unit. In: Watson J, Beswick K, editors. Mathematics: Essential research, essential practice (Proceedings of the 30th annual conference of the Mathematics Education Research Group of Australasia, Hobart. Adelaide, SA: MERGA; 2007. p. 815–823.Google Scholar
  55. Wilson S. 'Better you than me': Mathematics anxiety and bibliotherapy in primary teacher professional learning. In: Hunter R, Bicknell B, Burgess T, editors. Crossing divides (Proceedings of the 32nd annual conference on Mathematics Education Research Group of Australasia. Palmerston North, NZ: MERGA; 2009. p. 603–610.Google Scholar
  56. Wilson S, Thornton S. 'The factor that makes us more effective teachers': Two pre-service primary teachers' experience of bibliotherapy. Mathematics Teacher Education and Development. 2008;9:21–35.Google Scholar
  57. Young-Loveridge J. Two decades of mathematics education reform in New Zealand: What impact on the attitudes of teacher education students? In: Sparrow L, Kissane B, Hurst C, editors. Shaping the future of mathematics education (Proceedings of the 33rd annual conference of the Mathematics Education Research Group of Australasia. Fremantle, WA: MERGA; 2010. p. 705–712.Google Scholar
  58. Zan R, Brown L, Evans J, Hannula MS. Affect in mathematics education: An introduction. Educational Studies in Mathematics. 2006;63(2):113–121.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Sense Publishers 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • Gregor Lomas
    • 1
  • Peter Grootenboer
    • 2
  • Catherine Attard
    • 3
  1. 1.School of Science, Mathematics and Technology EducationThe University of AucklandAucklandNew Zealand
  2. 2.Griffith Institute for Educational ResearchGriffith UniversityQueenslandAustralia
  3. 3.School of EducationUniversity of Western SydneySydneyAustralia

Personalised recommendations