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Developing a Social Constructivist Teaching and Learning Module on Dna for High School Students in Thailand

  • Thasaneeya R. Nopparatjamjomras

Abstract

The purpose of this study is to develop a social constructivist teaching module on DNA for high school students in Thailand. The first phase of the study in the teaching and learning of genetics concepts was studied. A social constructivist teaching module on DNA was developed in the second phase. The survey in Phase I was conducted with five high school biology teachers and thirty-one high school students from four schools in the Bangkok Education Service Area Office. Data from interviews were analyzed using content analysis. Results showed most teachers surveyed acknowledged the genetics concepts for students’ understanding were moderately difficult, which was supported by the poorer performance in most students’ answers.

Keywords

High School Student Learn Module Small Group Discussion Constructivist Teaching Teaching Genetic 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Sense Publishers 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • Thasaneeya R. Nopparatjamjomras
    • 1
  1. 1.Institute for Innovative Learning, Mahidol UniversityNakhon PathomThailand

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