Developing Assessments For A Learning Progression on Carbon-Transforming Processes in Socio-Ecological Systems

  • Hui Jin
  • Charles W. Anderson

Abstract

Learning progressions are descriptions of increasingly sophisticated ways of thinking about or understanding a topic (National Research Council [NRC], 2007). They provide promising frameworks for assessing students’ understanding and learning. In our work to develop a learning progression for carbon-transforming processes, we involved participants from a wide age range (fourth grade through 11th grade) and from two countries (the United States [US] and China). We involved participants from a wide age range in order to develop a learning progression spanning naïve reasoning to sophisticated scientific reasoning.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. American Association for the Advancement of Science. Benchmarks for science literacy. New York, NY: Oxford University Press; 1993.Google Scholar
  2. Anderson CW, Sheldon TH, DuBay J. The effects of instruction on college non-majors' conceptions of respiration and photosynthesis. Journal of Research in Science Teaching. 1990;27:761–776.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. Chen J, Anderson CW, Jin X. April). Paper presented at the annual meeting of the National Association for Research in Science Teaching, Garden Grove, CA: American and Chinese secondary students' written accounts of carbon cycling in socio-ecological systems; 2009.Google Scholar
  4. Choi J, Lee Y, Draney KL. April). Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Educational Research Association, San Diego, CA: Empirical validation of a learning progression; 2009.Google Scholar
  5. Cobb P, Confrey J, diSessa A, Lehrer R, Schauble L. Design experiments in educational research. Educational Researcher. 2003;32(1):9–13.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. Collins A, Joseph D, Bielaczyc K. Design research: Theoretical and methodological issues. Journal of the Learning Sciences. 2004;13:15–42.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. Dai, J.-h. E. (2005). Conceptualizations and cognitive relativism on result in Mandarin Chinese: A case study of Mandarin Chinese ba construction using a cognitive and centering approach (Doctoral dissertation, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA). Retrieved from http://etd.lsu.edu/docs/available/etd-04152005-112438/unrestricted/Dai_dis.pdf
  8. Edelson DC. Design research: What we learn when we engage in design. Journal of the Learning Sciences. 2002;11:105–121.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. Jin H, Anderson CW. April). Paper presented at the annual meeting of the National Association for Research in Science Teaching, Garden Grove, CA: Developing a long-term learning progression for energy in socio-ecological systems; 2008.Google Scholar
  10. Jin H, Zhan L, Anderson CW. April). A cross-cultural study: Comparing learning progressions for carbon-transforming processes of American and Chinese student. Paper presented at the annual meeting of the National Association for Research in Science Teaching, Garden Grove, CA; 2009.Google Scholar
  11. Lai, H.-l., & Chiang, S.-m. (2003). Intrapsychological force-dynamic interaction: Verbs of refraining graining in Hakka. Taiwan Journal of Linguistics, 1(2), 35-64.Google Scholar
  12. Lee O, Eichinger D, Anderson CW, Berkheimer GD, Blakeslee TD. Changing middle school students' conceptions of matter and molecules. Journal of Research in Science Teaching. 1993;30:249–270.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  13. Long Term Ecological Research Network. (2007). Integrative science for society and the environment: A plan for research, education, and cyberinfrastructure in the U.S. Retrieved from http://www.Lternet.edu/decadalplan/
  14. Mohan L, Chen J, Anderson CW. Developing a multi-year learning progression for carbon cycling in socio-ecological systems. Journal of Research in Science Teaching. 2009a;46:675–698.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  15. Mohan L, Chen J, Baek H, Anderson CW, Choi J, Lee Y. April). Validation of a multi-year carbon cycle learning progression: A closer look at progress variables and processes. Paper presented at the annual meeting of the National Association for Research in Science Teaching, Garden Grove, CA; 2009b.Google Scholar
  16. National Research Council. National science education standards. Washington, DC: National Academy Press; 1996.Google Scholar
  17. National Research Council. Knowing what students know: The science and design of educational assessment. Washington, DC: National Academy Press; 2001.Google Scholar
  18. National Research Council. Taking science to school: Learning and teaching science in grades K-8. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press; 2007.Google Scholar
  19. Pinker S. The stuff of thought: Language as a window into human nature. New York, NY: Penguin Group; 2007.Google Scholar
  20. Talmy L. Toward a cognitive semantics. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press; 2000.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Sense Publishers 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • Hui Jin
  • Charles W. Anderson

There are no affiliations available

Personalised recommendations