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A Positive, African Ethical Approach to Collecting and Interpreting Drawings

Some Considerations
  • Linda Theron
  • Jean Stuart
  • Claudia Mitchell

Abstract

All research is regulated by ethical principles that try to ensure that research participants are not harmed in any way by their participation in a research project. Universities and research bodies typically have robust ethical procedures and ethical codes that try to guarantee that researchers do ethical research.

Keywords

Applied Ethic Gender Base Violence Public Display Gender Violence Health Education Research 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Sense Publishers 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • Linda Theron
  • Jean Stuart
  • Claudia Mitchell

There are no affiliations available

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