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With Pictures and Words I Can Show You

Cartoons Portray Resilient Migrant Teenagers’ Journeys
  • Catherine Ann Cameron
  • Linda Theron

Abstract

Our researchi with adolescents highlights the necessity of projecting the voices of youth in order to come to understand and share their experiences fully (Cameron & Creating Peaceful Learning Environments Team, 2002a, 2002b). Teenagers have powerful statements to make about their own situations. Their narratives are powerful: They are insightful; they are veridical; they are deeply engaging; and, most importantly, youths have stories that can inform theory and practice.

Keywords

Emotional Security Birthday Party Youth Care Forum Reflective Discussion Early Childhood Research 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Sense Publishers 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • Catherine Ann Cameron
  • Linda Theron

There are no affiliations available

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