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Visualizing the White Spaces

Beginning the Journey toward Social Education
  • Susan McCormack
Chapter
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Abstract

The journey between Social Studies and Social Education leads this traveler down a mysterious path with “white spaces” on the map that continuously needs to be examined. Like others, my exploration into the heart of Social Education has been fraught with twists and turns requiring me to occasionally realign my internal compass. Navigating this journey I have discovered that each traveler’s itinerary is an individualized process allowing for divergent teaching and learning opportunities. In this context, the “white spaces” are rough hewn educational landscapes that create exhilarating learning experiences that are well worth the effort in the end in spite of the difficulties one encounters when exploring the road that is “wanting wear” (Frost, 1920). Following are shared moments from my travel log, which highlight my attempt to defy the “well-trodden” Social Studies path to choose the “less traveled” toward Social Education (Frost, 1920).

Keywords

Social Study White Space Teacher Preparation Program Visual Literacy National Geographic Society 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Sense Publishers 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • Susan McCormack
    • 1
  1. 1.Assistant Professor of Social EducationUniversity of Houston Clear LakeHoustonUSA

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