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Experiencing Social Education

  • Sabrina Marsh
Chapter
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Abstract

Isadora Duncan (1927/1996) famously said “What one has not experienced, one will never understand in print” (p. 60). Taking my cue from Isadora, I begin this chapter by dancing around barefoot with two very basic questions: what are the issues involved with modeling a social education philosophy around genuine communal experiences? And can communal experiences and the concepts of social education ever exist in a vacuum as two distinct pedagogical entities?

Keywords

Social Justice Experiential Learning Experiential Education Critical Theory Critical Consciousness 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Sense Publishers 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • Sabrina Marsh
    • 1
  1. 1.College of EducationUniversity of HoustonHoustonUSA

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